User Tools

Site Tools


classic:image_preprocessing

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
classic:image_preprocessing [2013/11/14 08:34]
henning_stummer [Resize Original]
classic:image_preprocessing [2015/10/16 09:01] (current)
penelope_chapron
Line 7: Line 7:
 {{:​image_archive:​filter:​icc.png?​nolink }} ICC color profiles are based on a vendor-independent standard by the International Color Consortium and define distinct color spaces for individual devices, such as monitors and printers. ​ This assures printed output will match the appearance on your monitor, assuming the devices support ICC color profiles. To manage the ICC color profile associated with an image, select the image and open the “ICC Color Profile” pre-processing tool from the image toolbox. {{:​image_archive:​filter:​icc.png?​nolink }} ICC color profiles are based on a vendor-independent standard by the International Color Consortium and define distinct color spaces for individual devices, such as monitors and printers. ​ This assures printed output will match the appearance on your monitor, assuming the devices support ICC color profiles. To manage the ICC color profile associated with an image, select the image and open the “ICC Color Profile” pre-processing tool from the image toolbox.
  
-If there is already an associated color profile, it will be displayed. ​ To assign a new color profile, open the drop-down list and choose the color profile for the device that recorded the original image -- typically your digital camera or your scanner. ​ (The drop-down list will only show color profiles for the RGB color space.)+If there is already an associated color profile, it will be displayed. ​ To assign a new color profile, open the drop-down list and choose the color profile for the device that recorded the original image -- typically your digital camera or your scanner. ​ (The drop-down list will only show color profiles for the RGB color space).
  
 When images are loaded that have new ICC color profiles, then those profiles are added automatically to the “ICC Color Profile” list and can be used with other images. When images are loaded that have new ICC color profiles, then those profiles are added automatically to the “ICC Color Profile” list and can be used with other images.
  
-You can set default color profiles to be associated with images that are loaded from specific sources. ​ Choose from the Menu Bar:  “Preferences” → “Image Archive → “ICC Color Profile.+You can set default color profiles to be associated with images that are loaded from specific sources. ​ Choose from the Menu Bar:  “Preferences” → “Image Archive” → “ICC Color Profile”.
  
 The “Cameras” list includes all models found in the Exif descriptors anywhere in the Image Archive. From the “File Extension” list, choose a graphics file type used by the specific camera. ​ From the “ICC Color Profile” list, choose the default color profile to be associated with the selected camera/file extension combination. ​ You can use the “Add” button to import new ICC color profiles from disk or other media. ​ Click the “Apply” button to save the default color profile association. The “Cameras” list includes all models found in the Exif descriptors anywhere in the Image Archive. From the “File Extension” list, choose a graphics file type used by the specific camera. ​ From the “ICC Color Profile” list, choose the default color profile to be associated with the selected camera/file extension combination. ​ You can use the “Add” button to import new ICC color profiles from disk or other media. ​ Click the “Apply” button to save the default color profile association.
 +
 ===== Resize Original ===== ===== Resize Original =====
  
Line 24: Line 25:
  
 StudioLine does allow you to permanently reduce the pixel size of original ​ images. ​ This may be useful if you scanned an original in better resolution than you ever expect to need.  You should keep in mind, however, that both print and internet technology keeps advancing with disk storage becoming increasingly affordable. ​ In a few years you could find yourself scrambling for that original size, which may have seemed excessive today. StudioLine does allow you to permanently reduce the pixel size of original ​ images. ​ This may be useful if you scanned an original in better resolution than you ever expect to need.  You should keep in mind, however, that both print and internet technology keeps advancing with disk storage becoming increasingly affordable. ​ In a few years you could find yourself scrambling for that original size, which may have seemed excessive today.
 +
 ==== Preparing to Resize ==== ==== Preparing to Resize ====
  
Line 34: Line 36:
 The “Image Size” drop-down menu offers a variety of options, including common standard sizes. ​ The choice “Use Original Image Size” will retain the current size when using this window to convert between graphics formats instead (for example from TIFF to JPEG). The “Image Size” drop-down menu offers a variety of options, including common standard sizes. ​ The choice “Use Original Image Size” will retain the current size when using this window to convert between graphics formats instead (for example from TIFF to JPEG).
  
-“Custom” activates the width and height controls to define any custom size.  The standard or custom size you choose defines a bounding rectangle into which StudioLine will proportionally scale the images. ​ Consequently,​ one side of the resized image (unless it’s a square) will be smaller than the chosen “Maximum Size,” if the selected width/​height proportions do not match the image’s proportions. ​ Enlarging images produces poor image quality and is therefore not recommended.+“Custom” activates the width and height controls to define any custom size.  The standard or custom size you choose defines a bounding rectangle into which StudioLine will proportionally scale the images. ​ Consequently,​ one side of the resized image (unless it’s a square) will be smaller than the chosen “Maximum Size”if the selected width/​height proportions do not match the image’s proportions. Enlarging images produces poor image quality and is therefore not recommended.
  
-The option “Automatically Adapt to Orientation,” keeps your portrait orientation images portrait, and your landscape orientation landscape. ​ Let us say you specify an image size of 640x480 pixels, then a portrait orientation image will be 640 pixels high, whereas a landscape orientation image will be 640 pixels wide.  The long side will always receive the larger amount of pixels. ​ This saves a lot of extra steps and headaches.+The option “Automatically Adapt to Orientation” keeps your portrait orientation images portrait, and your landscape orientation landscape. Let us say you specify an image size of 640x480 pixels, then a portrait orientation image will be 640 pixels high, whereas a landscape orientation image will be 640 pixels wide. The long side will always receive the larger amount of pixels. This saves a lot of extra steps and headaches.
  
 Next to the image size input fields, you can choose the unit of measurement as pixels, inches, or centimeters. ​ That is helpful if images are later emailed to be printed at a given paper size.  The field “DPI” will let you control the print resolution. Next to the image size input fields, you can choose the unit of measurement as pixels, inches, or centimeters. ​ That is helpful if images are later emailed to be printed at a given paper size.  The field “DPI” will let you control the print resolution.
Line 42: Line 44:
 ==== Format ==== ==== Format ====
  
-Near the bottom of the panel you select the file format. ​ The default is “JPEG,” which uses a very effective compression algorithm to reduce file size while retaining optimum image quality. ​ JPEG format gives you the further option to customize image quality and file size as you need it.  The higher the quality, the more memory space the file will use.  The lower the file size, the lower the image quality, the quicker the image will load on a web page or in an email.+Near the bottom of the panel you select the file format. ​ The default is “JPEG”which uses a very effective compression algorithm to reduce file size while retaining optimum image quality. JPEG format gives you the further option to customize image quality and file size as you need it.  The higher the quality, the more memory space the file will use. The lower the file size, the lower the image quality, the quicker the image will load on a web page or in an email.
  
-Other file formats have a static image quality, equivalent to the original quality. ​ These formats have high disk space requirements.+Other file formats have a static image quality, equivalent to the original quality. These formats have high disk space requirements.
classic/image_preprocessing.txt · Last modified: 2015/10/16 09:01 by penelope_chapron